Safety at Work: Policy meets performance

???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????discussion of Dr Sharron O’Neill’s research with Safe Work Australia in late 2014 – by WHS consultant Kevin Jones – highlighted how better WHS accounting might improve both work, health and safety (WHS) policy and performance.

Jones reported on the 2014 annual Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU) conference on occupational health and safety, which was held in Melbourne last October. The conference was addressed by the ALP Shadow Minister for Employment Relations: Brendan O’Connor MP.

According to Mr O’Conner, the Royal Commission into the Home Insulation Scheme risks distracting attention from broader deficiencies in the WHS laws that should ‘protect the interests of working people, particularly young workers’.

Whether legal reform can improve WHS outcomes is a matter of debate. Jones’s view is that the needed changes are:

unlikely to come through laws, particularly as OHS/WHS laws remain a State responsibility. Change will need to be attempted through modifying the public services’ processes of consultation and collaboration of safety-related matters.

However, the Shadow Minister also discussed the economic argument for improving WHS policy and performance, which suggests that WHS accounting has a critical role to play:

If you look at the costs that are borne by a community because of bad health and safety laws, on economic grounds you win the argument, leave aside the fact that you’ve torn a family or community apart because of injury or death.

If the economic grounds of WHS are indeed central to the public policy argument, then accounting needs to be able to bring the costs of WHS into both public policy discussions and organisations’ reports in a clear and comparable way.

As Dr O’Neill’s presentations on WHS reporting have shown, both financial and non-financial accounting has some way to go to adequately recognise either the community or organisational costs of WHS practices, or to effectively communicate good WHS practices to stakeholders.

But if the current standard of WHS reporting is part of the problem, then new WHS reporting mechanisms, which Dr O’Neill’s research is helping to develop, have the capacity to be an important part of the solution.

For more information on this research, or on improving WHS performance in your organisation, contact Dr O’Neill at: sharron.oneill@mq.edu.au.

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