Learning the Lessons: Alan Cameron on Audit Committees at the joint IGAP & CPA Australia Annual Forum.

Camerron photoAlan Cameron AO used his address to the IGAP and CPA Australia Annual Forum in 2014 on ‘The evolving role of audit committees’ to draw lessons from the HIH and Centro cases for contemporary audit committees.

Cameron is current Chair of the ASX Corporate Governance Council and several large public companies, and also a former Deputy Chancellor of the University of Sydney.

He addressed the IGAP and CPA Australia Annual Forum in his personal capacity, drawing on his extensive experience to provide insights into what the Centro and HIH judgements reveal about good audit committee practice.

Cameron’s keynote address emphasised directors’ role in addressing governance issues early, rather than becoming ‘gatekeepers’ after the fact:

‘To me gatekeepers are auditors and regulators and other people who look at the results afterwards. I think directors are rather earlier in the line than gatekeepers’.

Looking back over the Centro and HIH cases, Cameron highlighted three key lessons for how boards and audit committees can best execute their functions.

  1. Keeping the board and audit committee separate

The HIH judgement underscored how audit committees need to meet separately from the board if the accounts are to be examined rigorously. In Cameron’s words:

‘If the whole board is involved in the work of the audit committee, the audit committee is not doing its job. Its job is to have a first detailed look and if the whole board is there all the time as a matter of routine that isn’t going to happen’.

‘To me a troubling aspect of the processes of the HIH audit committee was its practice of meeting before and effectively in the presence of the board. As a result of that practice it operated as little more than an extension of the board… I see that now all over the place’.

  1. Making time to review financial reports properly

Another impediment to rigorously examining the accounts is not allowing the audit committee and the board time to consider the financials properly. Among other issues, the HIH judgement criticised ‘the practice of the six monthly financial reports being considered by the audit committee, approved by the board and announced all on the same day’.

Not only do directors need time between meetings to adequately review the financial reports, they also need time to access the right people:

‘The audit committee should meet auditors in the absence of management before or in the course of each meeting or at least from time to time. The material should be distributed well in advance of a committee meeting’

  1. A clear audit committee charter

Cameron’s analysis of the HIH judgement also highlighted the absence of a clear role for the audit committee in that company. By contrast, a clear and detailed charter can help define and clarify the audit committee’s role:

‘The [HIH] charter is short and the terms of reference are couched in general language. They do not clearly define and establish the role and responsibilities of the committee and its relationship to the board. There is no evidence that the terms were reviewed annually to see that the committee in its role remained relevant to the needs of HIH. So I think the clear message from that is short might be dangerous. You do need to review it every year’.

Learning the Lessons

Although Cameron’s address focused on audit-committee practice, he also reminded participants of the whole board’s responsibilities under law:

‘Whilst an audit committee has an important role of monitoring oversight that is not to the exclusion of the role of a director to consider the financial accounts for him or herself’.

Cameron concluded by highlighting several practices that directors might adopt, including:

  • Insisting on reviewing paper copies of the reports;
  • Checking organisations’ systems for dealing with whistle-blowers; and
  • Paying attention to internal audit.

Ultimately though, Cameron stressed that there is no substitute for directors using their limited time to investigate the right issues:

‘We can set up all these structures, but if people don’t ask the right questions, and be appropriately sceptical, then you will still have these problems’

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