Communicating Safety: Avoiding common mistakes

???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????A discussion by James Harkness (for Zenergy Recruitment), headed Reporting on WHS: where companies go wrong, illustrates how IGAP’s Dr Sharron O’Neill’s research on work health and safety (WHS) can improve how organisations communicate their safety practices.

Harkness cites Dr O’Neill’s presentation at Safe Work Australia’s Virtual Seminar Series in October, which found a large gap between the WHS information stakeholders want and what annual reports provide.

Some common mistakes organisations make are:

  • Providing a generic statement of commitment to WHS, but without detailed information on WHS governance;
  • Failing to provide key lead and lag indicators, which can deliver important evidence on whether WHS practices are effective;
  • Providing limited evidence on whether audits and training sessions are effective;
  • A lack of consistent indicators and evidence e.g. Using different names for the same indicator, failing to define their indicators or failing to stick to their definitions;
  • Being reluctant to talk about the severity of injuries, effectively hiding the impact of gaps in companies’ health and safety systems; and
  • Building inaccurate narratives around their data.

By contrast, for best-practice WHS reporting in annual reports, organisations should:

  • Recognise who the users of the report are;
  • Clearly articulate their WHS vision;
  • Identify their critical risks;
  • Outline how risks are being managed; and
  • Acknowledge the consequences of failure;
  • Provide analysis where there has been a serious injury or illness: What happened, what was the cause, what is the lesson, what is being done to prevent this occurring again.

Where poor WHS reporting can be confusing or misleading, Dr O’Neill’s address highlighted how best-practice WHS reporting in annual reports can help instil confidence in an organisation’s WHS performance and practices in its stakeholders.

For more information on this research, or on improving WHS performance in your organisation, contact Dr O’Neill at: sharron.oneill@mq.edu.au.

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